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The Anzac Violin

By Jennifer Beck | Hardback | 1 Review(s)

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More than 20 years after publication of the classic NZ story, The Bantam and the Soldier, Jennifer Beck and Robyn Belton have joined forces again to produce another heartwarming story from the First World War. This time its the true story of Otagos Alexander Aitken and the violin that travelled with... read more

Format
Hardback
Release Date
01 Feb 2018
Author(s)
Jennifer Beck
Publisher
Scholastic New Zealand Limited
ISBN-13
9781775433910
Pages
40
Format
Hardback
Release Date
01 Feb 2018
Author(s)
Jennifer Beck
Publisher
Scholastic New Zealand Limited
ISBN-13
9781775433910
Pages
40

Ships in 4-10 days
Local Version

$27.99
-
+
Add to Cart

Reviews

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15 Feb 2018

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The authors have joined once again and are best known for their award-winning book Bantam and the Soldier.
Each year we are fortunate to have a range of ANZAC books that retell stories of courage and camaraderie in wartime. This one tells Alexander Aitken’s story – a musician from Dunedin and his travels through, Cairo, Gallipoli and the Somme in France. All the way, his beloved violin travelled with him bringing comfort to himself and fellow soldiers. His music would boost morale and remind the New Zealand soldiers of their home far away. Inside his violin case he inscribed the places he visited and there were times when he and the violin parted ways.
There is some symbolism to reflect on themes of comradeship, mate-ship and finding a solution to a problem – for example, a violin string breaks and an old telegraph wire is used as a substitute.
It was nearly midnight when they anchored off ANZAC Cove. There were stars, but no moon, the jagged ridge of the Gallipoli Peninsula loomed dark above them. Machine guns rattled in the distance. Silently the troops climbed down steep ladders to the boats that would carry them to shore...weighed down by the heavy pack on his back, Alexander still managed to hold the violin case in one hand...”

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15 Feb 2018

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