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The Birth of a Nation -

The Birth of a Nation

The Cinematic Past in the Present

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Over one hundred years since it premiered on cinema screens, D. W. Griffith's controversial photoplay The Birth of a Nation continues to influence American film production and to have relevance for race relations in the United States. While lauded at the time of its release for its visual and narrative innovations and a box office hit with film audiences, it provoked African American protest in 1915 for racially offensive content. In this collection of essays, contributors explore Griffith's film as text, artifact, and cultural legacy and place it into both the historical and transnational contexts of the first half of the 1900s and its resonances with current events in America, such as #BlackLivesMatter, #HollywoodSoWhite, and #OscarsSoWhite movements. Through studies of the film's reception, formal innovations in visual storytelling, and comparisons with contemporary movies, this work challenges the idea the United States has moved beyond racial problems and highlights the role of film and representation in the continued struggle for equality. This title is also available as an Open Access edition online at https://iu.pressbooks.pub/thebirthofanation/

Product code: 9780253042354

ISBN 9780253042354
Dimensions (HxWxD in mm) H229xW152
No. Of Pages 324
Publisher Indiana University Press
D.W. Griffith's controversial 1915 film The Birth of a Nation continues to have relevance for race relations in the United States. This work challenges the idea the U.S. has moved beyond racial problems and highlights the role of film and representation in the continued struggle for equality.