Print, Publicity, and Popular Radicalism in the 1790s - pr_35400

Print, Publicity, and Popular Radicalism in the 1790s

The Laurel of Liberty

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Jon Mee explores the popular democratic movement that emerged in the London of the 1790s in response to the French Revolution. Central to the movement's achievement was the creation of an idea of 'the people' brought into being through print and publicity. Radical clubs rose and fell in the face of the hostile attentions of government. They were sustained by a faith in the press as a form of 'print magic', but confidence in the liberating potential of the printing press was interwoven with hard-headed deliberations over how best to animate and represent the people. Ideas of disinterested rational debate were thrown into the mix with coruscating satire, rousing songs, and republican toasts. Print personality became a vital interface between readers and print exploited by the cast of radicals returned to history in vivid detail by Print, Publicity, and Popular Radicalism in the 1790s. This title is also available as Open Access.

Product code: 9781107590083

ISBN 9781107590083
No. Of Pages 293
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Dimensions (HxWxD in mm) H230xW153xS20
Series Cambridge Studies in Romanticism
A revisionary account, by a leading scholar, of the turbulent decade of the 1790s, during which radical ideas spread to Britain from revolutionary France and were circulated and popularised in new ways. The study offers a general account together with case studies of key individuals of the period. This title is also available as Open Access.