DUE TO INTERNATION DELIVERY DELAYS, WE CANNOT GUARANTEE DELIVERY OF INTERNATIONAL ORDERS PRIOR TO CHRISTMAS.
Rethinking Unemployment and the Work Ethic - pr_262420

Rethinking Unemployment and the Work Ethic

Beyond the 'Quasi-Titmuss' Paradigm

Hardback

$199.40

Or 4 payments of $49.85 with

delivery message Free delivery for orders over $49.99

Add to Wish List
Delivered in 10 - 14 days
Available for Click and Collect
While recent Labour and coalition governments have insisted that many unemployed people prefer state benefits to a job, and have tightened the rules attached to claiming unemployment benefits, mainstream academic research repeatedly concludes that only a tiny minority of unemployed benefit claimants are not strongly committed to employment. Andrew Dunn argues that the discrepancy can be explained by UK social policy academia leaving important questions unanswered. Dunn presents findings from four empirical studies which, in contrast to earlier research, focused on unemployed people's attitudes towards unattractive jobs and included interviews with people in welfare-to-work organisations. All four studies' findings were consistent with the view that many unemployed benefit claimants prefer living on benefits to undertaking jobs which would increase their income, but which they find unattractive. Thus, the studies gave support to politicians' view about the need to tighten benefit rules.

Product code: 9781137032102

ISBN 9781137032102
Dimensions (HxWxD in mm) H216xW140
No. Of Pages 234
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
While recent Labour and coalition governments have insisted that many unemployed people prefer state benefits to a job, and have tightened the rules attached to claiming unemployment benefits, mainstream academic research repeatedly concludes that only a tiny minority of unemployed benefit claimants are not strongly committed to employment.