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An Analysis of David Brion Davis's The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, 1770-1823 - pr_20680

An Analysis of David Brion Davis's The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, 1770-1823

By Duncan Money, Jason Xidas

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How was it possible for opponents of slavery to be so vocal in opposing the practice, when they were so accepting of the economic exploitation of workers in western factories - many of which were owned by prominent abolitionists? David Brion Davis's The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, 1770-1823, uses the critical thinking skill of analysis to break down the various arguments that were used to condemn one set of controversial practices, and examine those that were used to defend another. His study allows us to see clear differences in reasoning and to test the assumptions made by each argument in turn. The result is an eye-opening explanation that makes it clear exactly how contemporaries resolved this apparent dichotomy - one that allows us to judge whether the opponents of slavery were clear-eyed idealists, or simply deployers of arguments that pandered to their own base economic interests.

Product code: 9781912128167

ISBN 9781912128167
Dimensions (HxWxD in mm) H198xW129
Series The Macat Library
No. Of Pages 89
Publisher Macat International Limited
Slavery had been accepted in Western culture for centuries. So why did a movement suddenly rise up in the industrial era calling for its abolition? Could it be that people had suddenly become more enlightened and humanitarian? Or were there other, more compelling and perhaps self-serving reasons for this sudden about-turn?