Free and Unfree Labor in Atlantic and Indian Ocean Port Cities (1700-1850) - pr_1810

Free and Unfree Labor in Atlantic and Indian Ocean Port Cities (1700-1850)

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Colonial and post-colonial port cities in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean regions brought together laboring populations of many different backgrounds and statuses - legally free or semi-free wage-laborers, soldiers, sailors, and the self-employed, indentured servants, convicts, and slaves. From the seventeenth to the nineteenth century the labor of these 'motley crews' made port cities crucial hubs of the emerging capitalist world market and centers of imperial infrastructure. The nine chapters in this volume investigate the interaction between different groups of laborers around the docks and the neighborhoods that stretched behind them. How did the mixture of many different groups of laborers shape patterns of work and life, authority and control, exclusion and inclusion, group-competition and joint resistance? What roles did gender, race and status play in maintaining divisions or enabling solidarities? Together, the nine case studies present a vibrant picture of social relations and working-class cultures in port cities.

Product code: 9781108708562

ISBN 9781108708562
Dimensions H229xW152xS12
No. of pages 266
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Series International Review of Social History Supplements
Colonial and post-colonial port cities in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean regions brought together laboring populations of many different backgrounds and statuses, from soldiers and sailors to convicts and slaves. This volume examines gender, race and status to present a vibrant picture of social relations and working-class cultures in port cities.