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Advanced Topics in the Arithmetic of Elliptic Curves - pr_243805

Advanced Topics in the Arithmetic of Elliptic Curves

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This book continues the treatment of the arithmetic theory of elliptic curves begun in the first volume. The book begins with the theory of elliptic and modular functions for the full modular group r(1), including a discussion of Hekcke operators and the L-series associated to cusp forms. This is followed by a detailed study of elliptic curves with complex multiplication, their associated Grossencharacters and L-series, and applications to the construction of abelian extensions of quadratic imaginary fields. Next comes a treatment of elliptic curves over function fields and elliptic surfaces, including specialization theorems for heights and sections. This material serves as a prelude to the theory of minimal models and Neron models of elliptic curves, with a discussion of special fibers, conductors, and Ogg's formula. Next comes a brief description of q-models for elliptic curves over C and R, followed by Tate's theory of q-models for elliptic curves with non-integral j-invariant over p-adic fields. The book concludes with the construction of canonical local height functions on elliptic curves, including explicit formulas for both archimedean and non-archimedean fields.

Product code: 9780387943282

ISBN 9780387943282
Dimensions (HxWxD in mm) H235xW155
Series Graduate Texts in Mathematics
Edition Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1994
No. Of Pages 528
Publisher Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
In the introduction to the first volume of The Arithmetic of Elliptic Curves (Springer-Verlag, 1986), I observed that "the theory of elliptic curves is rich, varied, and amazingly vast," and as a consequence, "many important topics had to be omitted."